Not Always The Farm Worker’s Fault

IT IS a very common complaint of farm owners, especially employees or professionals who love farming but can only attend to their farms on weekends. They usually say that their farm worker is lazy. He does not know much about farming. He is not doing anything on the farm.
  
That could be true. But in some instances, the caretaker or worker is not always at fault. In a number of cases that we know, the farm owner is at fault, too. The worker is not doing much because he is not given enough tools to perform his job. For instance, is there enough water to take care of the plants and animals? If there’s none, it is impossible to grow plants or to raise livestock.
  
Maybe, there is a water source. But has the worker been apprised of what the owner wants to do with his farm? Is he being provided with the right seeds, the tools to prepare the land, the fertilizers and crop protection products?
 
Then the owner has to give him assignment to accomplish during each day or week. The owner should talk to him in a manner that the worker does not lose his dignity.
 
One fellow was telling me the other week about a retired politician who often shouts at his worker. The worker is not inspired at all to do his best.
 
And then the worker has to be fairly remunerated for what he does. I know of a farm owner (bless his soul, he passed away last year) who used to have only two workers attending to his 6-hectare orchard. The farm was spic and span. No weedy portions and the trees were regularly watered, fertilized and protected from pests and diseases.
 
How did he do it? With the right incentives, the two workers worked like office employees. They rendered 8 hours of work everyday, or even longer if needed. And so they were able to keep the farm in perfect shape. And they were accordingly rewarded for their conscientiousness.
 
It is important to keep your farm workers inspired. Treat them like human beings.
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One thought on “Not Always The Farm Worker’s Fault

  1. Even further to the article is the ability of the owner to provide clear and concise directions as well as a good foundation into the future. Many times we have had to re-do somethings as it was put or piled in an incorrect place, a place that we intended to do something else. Whose fault is that? The owner.

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